snorkel guides tagged posts

The New Buoys in Akumal

In the past weeks, buoys have been installed by the authorities in Akumal Bay. There is little to no information public information on the zones, but this popped up today on Hotel Akumal Caribe’s Facebook page.

For those of you that have seen the new buoys in the bay, this is the sparse information we have about them. (Beyond saying that they are not aesthetically pleasing and very confusing)
The permits for snorkel tour operators state that permit holders are only allowed to take tours around two circuits as per the map below.
  • The dark purple area around the two circuits is for guided snorkel tours only in a clockwise direction. (“Poligono de nado”)
  • The white area on the first 50 meters from shore is for swimming. Anyone can go in there and use it for recreational purposes.
  • The turquoise area denotes the navigation channels for motorized watercraft.
  • The light pink states it is for dive use although that area is too shallow and has reef.
  • The lime green area is restricted to everyone. So no swimming or snorkelling here.
  • The yellow area is labelled” zoned for sustainable recreation activities” but no rules or regulations explained.

There are no explanations for the use of the rest of the bay.

There are a lot of questions that these permits and map have raised for those that are not on snorkel tours, and want to go snorkelling on their own. Furthermore, no government authority has been able to clarify our doubts or answer our questions.

There is still no management plan in place. One would think that this would go before giving out permits. CONANP, who put out this map is supposed to put the management plan in place and has yet to have a constant presence in Akumal. The only supervision being carried out is by PROFEPA, (the environmental police) but it is sporadic and ineffective in controlling the snorkel tours, let alone overseeing the use of the rest of the bay.

 

These are our conclusions:

 

Guided tours are not being controlled. Snorkelers with no guides do not know where to go, when it’s ok for them to snorkel or what gear is allowed. Sometimes they are told to use short fins, sometimes they are not told anything. Sometimes they are told to wear a life jacket, sometimes only when with a guide. Sometimes they are told that they cannot wear an inflatable life jacket, and so on. The confusion continues. And sadly, there are no concrete answers.

There are no set limits of use for the entire bay, and the limits of use for the circuits by the permit holders is also not clearly stated in the permits.

The “quasi “rules are for everyone, without regard to where they come from, or where they are staying. The properties on the beach do not regulate the use of the bay. This is strictly the jurisdiction of the government, and they have yet to show a professional logical and sustainable management plan based on real science.

The original article can be viewed here:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/hotel-akumal-caribe/the-new-buoys-in-the-bay/10154553260551930/

WARNING: Swimming with Turtles in Akumal Bay

A joint warning from the Tulum Hotel Association, Riviera Maya Hotel Association and the Hotel Association of Cancun and Puerto Morelos was issued and published in Novedades and PorEsto! newspapers today, June 2, 2017.

The following is a translation of the warning message.

 

Warning: Swimming with Turtles in Akumal Bay

The General Directorate of Wildlife (Dirección General de Vida Silvestre), a unit of the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), authorized various individuals and cooperatives to conduct guided swimming tours with turtles. The permits were granted without verifying or requiring that the service providers and their tour guides had proper instruction or training, such as swimming abilities and water rescue procedures. It was not verified that these individuals had the necessary infrastructure to properly and safely provide this service,  nor was it confirmed if they had insurance coverage in case of accident and/or damage. Neither did they verify if these individuals have criminal records. These omissions have resulted in fatal accidents!

The Tulum Hotel Association encourages visitors, national and international, to verify that the service providers of their choice comply with the following minimum conditions to ensure their safety and promote the sustainable development of the Bay of Akumal:

  1. Tour guides accredited by Secretariat of Federal Tourism as “Tour guides for the interpretation of nature, specialized in swimming with turtles, under NOM-TUR-009-2002”.
  2. Liability and medical insurance in the event of an accident.
  3. Showers so that clients can rinse off before entering the water, since  sunscreens and other chemicals have been proven to damage marine species.
  4. First aid equipment, and trained and certified personnel.
  5. Municipal Operating Licences.

Help us promote safety and sustainability in Bahia de Akumal / Akumal Bay

A Poor Example of Protection Efforts in Akumal Bay

A few weeks ago, the “snorkel with turtles” suspension in Akumal Bay was lifted after only 51 days and SEMARNAT reissued permits to commercial operators.

Much like before, only those with a permit can conduct tours in the bay, and each permit holder is expected to follow certain limitations and restrictions to conduct their business in a sustainable and prescribed way within a specific protected area within the bay. Some of those limitations include:

  • Snorkel activities can only be carried out between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
  • No more than 6 people/group plus a guide.
  • The minimum distance between groups is 10 meters.

A full list of rules for tourist service providers can be found on CONANP’s Facebook page.

Yet in the past few weeks, since the permits were issued, several rules are being ignored. Case in point, the following irregularities and violations have been witnessed:

  • Snorkel tours are being conducted before the hours of 9 a.m.
  • Snorkel tours are being conducted after 5 p.m.
  • Commercial tour providers rumoured to not having a permit are conducting tours and operating in Akumal Bay.
  • Snorkel groups are exceeding the limit of 6 people per group
  • Snorkel groups are not keeping a 10m distance

Why are the rules being broken?

There are several forces at work, as was the case before the suspension. First and foremost, it comes down to the lack of respect for the rules.

For years, many of these commercial operators have been conducting their business in whatever manner they see fit, focusing on profits first and ecological impact last. Also, history has proven that their conduct of operation comes from a different “playbook”—a playbook that condones setting up shop on private property, conducting business illegally, torching police stations and vehicles, vandalizing and theft as well as acts of physical assault against their fellow citizens and tourists… all actions that have come with minimal or no legal consequences.

So how can it be feasible to go from renegade and rebellious self-serving attitudes to having to follow the rules? Even the former permits which clearly stated a maximum of 12 people per day per tour operator were never followed along with other directives, so what possible incentive or motivation would make them follow the rules now?

Secondly, and perhaps the biggest reason as to why the rules cannot be followed falls onto the responsibility of the authorities with their lack of organization and ineffective enforcement and execution of any sort of overall management.

The most recent permits were reissued before the authorities bothered to conduct any scientific studies to establish the capacity limits for the bay or organize a cohesive management plan or even implement protocols or procedures to oversee or enforce the rules, effectively creating a “cart-before-the-horse” scenario.

Authorities are on the beach, but without a monitored, centralized entrance or organized procedures in place for both in water and on the beach activities, there is no way for the authorities to know the following:

  • which groups are entering—permitted or not,
  • which groups are entering with authorized guide,
  • how many people each group is entering with,
  • which circuit each which group is using,
  • are the groups following the timeline for each circuit, or
  • how many total snorkelers or beach goers have entered the beach that hour or day.

If the authorities can’t effectively monitor the activities, how are they expected to enforce the permit rules?

The simple answer right now is that they can’t. Without structure in place and only two PROFEPA staff to monitor all the activities and actions for over 30 permitted groups (alongside the unpermitted groups) in and out of the water, it is just not viable.

As a result of these serious and definite gaps, many of the tour operators are capitalizing on the situation. Tour groups are entering the bay before 9 a.m. and after 5 p.m. with more than six individuals because there are no authorities on the beach at these times. And even when there are authorities on the beach between 9 and 5, they simply don’t have the capacity to fully monitor or enforce those entering without a permit or those entering at a different access with more than six people.

Is protection a priority? 

So, it begs the question, is protection of Akumal Bay really a priority?

If protection of Akumal Bay were a priority, then each and every tour operator would be making a conscious effort to respect the rules and demand the same from each permit-holding colleague.

If protection of Akumal Bay were a priority for the authorities, and not just the façade of back patting and congratulatory credit in decreeing a protected area, a cohesive management plan (including capacity limits based on local scientific studies) with various approaches to administer that plan would have been developed and implemented even before the consideration of re-issuing permits to legitimate commercial tour operators with business permits and a business address.

If protection of Akumal Bay were a priority, an effective and comprehensive plan would take into account more than just the guided tours of the bay—it would consider the rental of snorkel equipment (a great contributor to the overuse of the bay), education and information for all users of the bay, and training and education to ensure all guides are qualified, insured, first-aid certified and all operating in a sustainable, standardized and legal manner.

But… when governments are financially encouraged to put the cart first, the priority for the horse is secondary at best—disregarding the vital planning, implementation, enforcement and management steps—thus resulting in Akumal Bay being a poor example of ecological protection designed by all levels of government involved.

DEFYING THE SUSPENSION ORDER; CHALLENGING THE AUTHORITY

Earlier today several local cooperatives took guided snorkeling tours in Akumal Bay, despite the ongoing temporary suspension and the suspension notice  clearly visible on the beach.

Guide from local cooperative walks his “snorkel with turtle” tour guests past military patrol, PROFEPA and suspension notice sign

The authorities were apparently  taken off guard and started documenting evidence. They were unable to stop this activity although they followed them into the water. Some tense interactions on the beach with the rest of the guides had the military standing by.

Profepa officials were seen on the phone, but they did not get the guides to desist, although they eventually stopped on their own. This seems to be a brazen act of rebellion and lack of respect for the authority, unless something else is happening here.

In addition, cooperatives have been taking tours in after Profepa staff leave at 5pm, and as of yesterday, the Profepa staff were doing overtime and left at 7pm. We hope to get some clarity about this situation soon.

Akumal Bay, land without law

The following article, Bahía de Akumal, tierra sin ley, was published in PorEsto! on March 8, 2017. Translation has been provided below.

The original article can be found here:
http://www.poresto.net/ver_nota.php?zona=qroo&idSeccion=6&idTitulo=544698

* * *

AKUMAL, TULUM: March 8, 2017—Employers and providers of accredited nautical services, established in Akumal Bay, blame the three levels of government for not proceeding in the areas that they are responsible for, one year after the natural refuge of turtles was decreed, consequently from the entrance to the coastal area shows the disorder, after the proliferation of street vendors and “pirates” who offer services for swimming with turtles.

David Ortiz Salinas, Vice President of the Hotel Association of Tulum (AHT) in his speech at the press conference held in a well-known hotel in the Riviera Maya, recalled that last Tuesday, March 7, marked one year since the decree of the refuge area of turtles.

After the order to suspend swimming with turtles by PROFEPA, it makes it clear that there are no permits of any kind, for anyone, for such practice.

Therefore, he called on the relevant authorities to intervene, because the bay and marine species   are in danger, and it has reached a saturation point.

“There is a lack of coordination among all levels of government, among the same environmental authorities who have not been able to put order, lack of rule of law, lack of consequences for those who transgress the rights of others, those are the requests: that the authority in the field implement and enforce laws for all,” said Héctor Lizárraga, director of the CEA, who recalled in the same issue when they started with studies of marine species and reefs, have since witnessed the significant deterioration of species , so it is that in 2008, through a scientific study that was addressed to SEMARNAT, that eight years later they have considered it appropriate, and why the authority decreed the area of refuge.

But nowadays they have somehow seen a lack of action and absence of environmental authorities, which have in some way also led to the activities that should be sustainable in the area of refuge, comprising an area of 6 kilometers of coast and one kilometer offshore.

Although the intention is to protect species of turtles, sea grass, coral and mangrove in total the biodiversity of Akumal they are also highlighted in other places which has let to development without order and to the gradual deterioration which makes it all that more important that the federal authorities have taken a step to monitor compliance with the restriction on non-extractive activity with turtles.

Also that they maintain their position of not issuing permits until they can count on sufficient elements embodied in the protection program.

Arturo Orosco, a representative of the Akumal Dive Center, said that Akumal is living through an environmental, social and tourist services disorder that has generated enormous wealth for the people of Akumal.

He places the responsibility for creating this chaos, a disorder in the tourist services to the pueblo of Akumal; not to forget that the problem that Akumal is living through is purely commercial, commercial activities have not been regularized by the corresponding authorities, giving rise to people who have arrived as opportunists.

Adolfo Contreras, president of the Hotel Association of Tulum (AHT) and Edgar López, representative of “Piratas de Akumal”, a cooperative established for 10 years, was present at the press conference.